The Lab MPs who abstained/voted against giving Parliament Brexit say – Tory non-rebels still to blame

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The Commons Chamber during today’s Brexit debate (image: ParliamentLive TV)

Earlier today, the government narrowly defeated an amendment to the EU Withdrawal Bill that would have given Parliament its proper democratic say – Brexit was, after all, about taking back control – on whatever Brexit deal or excuse for a deal Theresa May eventually presents.

The amendment was defeated by 319 votes to 303.

The full list of Labour MPs who voted against the amendment or abstained from voting is as follows:

Against

John Mann, Bassetlaw
Frank Field, Birkenhead
Kate Hoey, Vauxhall
Graham Stringer, Blackley & Broughton

Abstained

Kevin Barron, Rother Valley
Caroline Flint, Don Valley
Jim Fitzpatrick, Poplar & Limehouse
Gareth Snell, Stoke Central

If all of these MPs had voted in support of the amendment, the final result would have been 315-311, so the amendment would still have been defeated.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn pushed this amendment hard and parliamentary sources report that Labour’s ‘Whips were all over it’.

This means that the blame for the defeat of this vital amendment rests squarely on the shoulders of the so-called ‘Tory rebels’ who tamely, gullibly swallowed yet another line from Theresa May and – just like last week – did anything but actually rebel.

Six Tories did rebel. These were Ken Clarke, Sarah Wollaston, Anna Soubry, Heidi Allen, Antoinette Sandbach and Philip Lee.

Shame on the others – and shame especially on the so-called Labour ‘moderates’ and on the ‘FBPE’-hashtag obsessives who have spent weeks talking up the virtues of Tory ‘rebels’ while wilfully ignoring the parliamentary arithmetic and political realities to attack Corbyn when the blame and responsibility belong fully to the Tory government and Tory serial-non-rebels.

The ‘Brexit for the few’ that the UK is on course for is and will remain the fault of a feeble, chaotic Tory government and the combination of utter incompetence and collapse-by-design of its various factions.

(A small number of Labour MPs were missing because of illness or unavoidable causes and, because of the vagaries of the parliamentary reporting system, recorded as abstaining. Given that the Labour Whip even extended to seriously ill MPs arriving in wheelchairs, it’s a given that those missing MPs could not possibly have attended – and similarly absent Tories will have . cancelled them out.?

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12 responses to “The Lab MPs who abstained/voted against giving Parliament Brexit say – Tory non-rebels still to blame

  1. Pingback: The Lab MPs who abstained/voted against giving Parliament Brexit say – Tory non-rebels still to blame | The SKWAWKBOX | sdbast·

  2. Pingback: The Lab MPs who abstained/voted against giving Parliament Brexit say – Tory non-rebels still to blame | The SKWAWKBOX – leftwing nobody·

  3. There can be no doubt now that there has to be ‘open selection’ for MPs prior to the next election. The MPs who failed to support Corbyn in this vote are only a few of the many who are keeping their powder dry, ready to launch another attack at an opportune moment.

    • I’m afraid Gareth Snell for example, in the most brexit ward in the country would be hung drawn and quartered if he’d done anything else.

  4. Party politics have no place. The referendum has delivered the verdict of the people. Pro remain, middle class liberals are not Labour and do not reflect the working class.

    • In a democracy, ‘the people’ have the right to change their minds. You cannot undermine democracy with democracy.

      The final decision is not one you can change in a few years as in a General Election.

      • In that case they’d have the right to change their minds again an again depending on the popular narrative. What you’re supporting is managed democracy.

      • ‘lundiel’ what you are saying is another version of ‘make people vote again and again until they come up with the right answer’. There is a finite time for us to decide, we can’t just keep on voting.

        If you saw Arron Banks and Andy Wigmore appearing in front of the parliamentary committee, you should now know why the Brexit vote went the way it did. It wasn’t, as some have contended, due to the noble actions of the working class voting on principle because of the way they (we) have been treated, it was because many of them were conned.

        Banks and Wigmore scoffed at the committee for thinking the Leave case was about facts. They were honest enough to tell the truth, it wasn’t about facts, it was about emotion. This is exactly the way Banks runs his insurance business and makes his millions, he is an expert at making people feel worried enough to buy his products.

        As more and more true facts emerge from the shambolic ‘negotiations’ it has become clearer to many that Brexit is constitutional vandalism and that those who will lose out most will be the working class. It won’t be the right wing millionaire Brexiters in the Tory Party. This is why another vote, whatever it’s called, is essential.

        Brexit is not just for Christmas……

  5. Thoughts with Naz Shah, who seriously ill, arrived in a wheelchair, a sick bucket and a care worker. Perhaps Kate Hoey, Frank Field and the others could reflect on that. But then again……

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